Sustainable Development Goals

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Learn about immunisation’s key role in achieving 14 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals

In September 2015, countries adopted a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all.

Immunisation is one of the best buys in global health and has a crucial role in achieving 14 of the 17 SDGs. As one of the most far-reaching health interventions, it closely reflects the ethos of the SDGs: “leaving no one behind”.

HEALTHY CHILDREN = INCREASED PROSPERITY

Immunisation has a direct impact on reducing poverty. Vaccinated, healthy children can go to school and grow up to become productive adults, and parents can work instead of caring for sick children. In Gavi-supported countries, for every US$ 1 spent on immunisation, US$ 18 are saved in healthcare costs, lost wages and lost productivity due to illness. When considering the broader value of people living longer, healthier lives, the return on investment rises to US$ 48 per US$ 1 spent.

IMMUNISATION + NUTRITION = HEALTHIER FAMILIES

Immunisation and good nutrition go hand in hand. Vaccine-preventable diseases often tip marginally nourished children into a malnourished state. Malnourished children are more likely to die from infectious diseases such as diarrhoea, measles and pneumonia, many of which can be prevented by vaccines.

IMMUNISATION = LONGER, HEALTHIER LIVES

Immunisation is one of the most cost-effective ways to ensure long and healthy lives. Every year, vaccines save 2-3 million lives, and millions more are protected from disease and disability. Since 2000, Vaccine Alliance partners have helped countries to immunise almost 640 million children, saving over 9 million lives in the long term.

VACCINES = IMPROVED LEARNING

Vaccines protect child health and support cognitive development, enabling children to learn more and have more opportunities. Research shows that vaccinated children get better marks and test scores at school. The benefits flow both ways: educated parents are more likely to have healthy, vaccinated children.

IMMUNISATION = EMPOWERED WOMEN AND GIRLS

Immunisation have an important role in empowering girls and women through better health. We work to ensure that both boys and girls have equal access to vaccines. Our support for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for adolescent girls can prevent up to 90% of cervical cancer cases. Rubella vaccines protect pregnant women from having their babies develop congenital rubella syndrome – one of the main causes of birth defects.

CLEAN WATER + VACCINES = LESS DISEASE

Immunisation, along with better sanitation and hygiene, can prevent some of the leading causes of child death in developing countries, such as diarrhoea, cholera and other infectious diseases. Collectively, these three interventions play a fundamental role in ensuring children can thrive and survive, no matter where they live.

EFFICIENT EQUIPMENT = CLEANER ENVIRONMENT

Vaccines need to be properly stored and transported to stay safe and effective, but up to 90% of health facilities in developing countries lack proper equipment. Gavi’s cold chain equipment optimisation platform gives countries access to solar direct drive and energy efficient freezers. These are not only more reliable and cost-effective but also more environmentally friendly. Our support includes monitoring devices that ensure optimum energy usage and reduce wastage.

HEALTHY POPULATION = MORE PRODUCTIVE WORKFORCE

Vaccinated, healthy children free up parents’ time so they are able to work. In the long term, healthy children grow into a productive workforce and become strong contributors to the economy. In Gavi-supported countries, every US$ 1 spent on immunisation generates US$ 18 in savings on healthcare costs, lost wages and lost productivity. When considering the broader benefits of people living longer, healthier lives, the return rises to US$ 48.

NEW VACCINES = FAST-TRACKED INNOVATION

Innovation for new vaccines can inform testing and regulatory systems that better prepare the world against emerging health threats. The rapid development of a vaccine against Ebola contributed to a global strategy to “fast-track” effective tests, vaccines and medicines during epidemics.

BETTER HEALTH = INCREASED EQUALITY

High childhood immunisation coverage reduces diseases that often keep people and families in poverty, and gives children of all backgrounds the chance of a healthier and more productive future. By prioritising areas with low immunisation coverage, Gavi support brings basic healthcare to underserved communities.

IMMUNISATION = HEALTHIER CITIES

By 2030, nearly 60% of the global population will be living in cities. Immunisation is a cost-effective way to protect people living in densely populated urban areas against disease outbreaks. Improved vaccination coverage can reduce or stop the rising risk of epidemics and foster the growth of sustainable cities.

VACCINES = MITIGATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT

The impact of climate change cuts across the wellbeing, livelihood, health and security of people and societies, particularly for vulnerable and marginalised communities. Vaccines are critical to building people’s resilience to and mitigating the risk of outbreaks of diseases tied to climate change, such as yellow fever and cholera, particularly in urban or post-disaster settings.

STRONG HEALTH SYSTEMS = LONG-TERM STABILITY

Strong health systems and institutions, with immunisation as a core component, can help communities cope with emergencies and keep vulnerable populations healthy. Gavi’s health system strengthening support to fragile states is directly contributing to stronger and more efficient systems and institutions, contributing to social cohesion and advancing equity. Our new policy on fragility, emergencies and refugees help us to swiftly respond to countries facing these challenges.

INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIP = UNPRECEDENTED PROGRESS

Over the last two decades, the Vaccine Alliance’s innovative public-private partnership has transformed immunisation progress. Immunisation rates today are higher than ever. New vaccines are reaching developing countries at almost the same time as rich countries, often at a fraction of the price. None of this would have been possible without collaboration and innovation across the private and public sectors.

 

>2 million

Since its creation in 2013, the global oral cholera vaccine stockpile has been used to vaccinate more than 2 million people. In 2016, eight countries – the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Mozambique, Malawi, Niger, Somalia, South Sudan and Zambia – accessed the stockpile.

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